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Monday, September 5, 2016

New York City, Downtown


This view of lower Manhattan is from Brooklyn side, at Brooklyn Bridge Park. You can get to this location by using the following transportation:
A or C train to High Street station in Brooklyn.
2 or 3 train to Clark Street station in Brooklyn.
F train to York Street in Brooklyn.

Camera and Exposure Information:
Camera: Nikon D810
Lens: Nikon 24-120mm f/4
Shutter Speed: 252 seconds (4.2 minutes)
Aperture: f/8
ISO: 64
Focal Length: 24mm

Saturday, July 9, 2016

Dumbo, Brooklyn Bridge Water Front

Dumbo, Brooklyn Bridge Water Front
Camera => Nikon D810
Lens => Nikon 28mm f/1.8G
Aperture => f/16
Exposure => 46 seconds 
ISO => 31
Date Captured => July 8th 2016,  9:00PM

How to get to this location using public transportation:
Take the F train to York St.  Or, you can also take the A or C train to High Street.

Friday, May 27, 2016

Grand Central Terminal, NYC

Grand Central Terminal, NYC

Camera: Nikon D810
Lens: Nikon 28mm f/1.8G
Aperture: ƒ/2.8
Shutter Speed: 1/125
ISO:  3200

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Long Island City, East River Park

Long Island City - WAS_7443

How to get this place using public transportation:
Take the 7 train to Vernon Blvd Jackson Ave. From there, walk towards the East River (going North-West, 10-15 mins walk).
Photo Taken with Nikon D810

Sunday, March 13, 2016

Flatiron Building, in NYC Flatiron Building - WAS_5180 -- To get to this location you may take the "N" and/or the "R" train to 23rd St.

The Flatiron Building, originally the Fuller Building, is a triangular 22-story[4] steel-framed landmarked building located at 175 Fifth Avenue in the borough of ManhattanNew York City, and is considered to be a groundbreaking skyscraper. Upon completion in 1902, it was one of the tallest buildings in the city at 20 floors high,[5] and one of only two skyscrapers north of 14th Street – the other being the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower, one block east. The building sits on a triangular block formed by Fifth AvenueBroadway and East 22nd Street, with 23rd Street grazing the triangle's northern (uptown) peak. As with numerous other wedge-shaped buildings, the name "Flatiron" derives from its resemblance to a cast-iron clothes iron.[6]
The building, which has been called "[o]ne of the world's most iconic skyscrapers, and a quintessential symbol of New York City",[7] anchors the south (downtown) end of Madison Square and the north (uptown) end of the Ladies' Mile Historic District. The neighborhood around it is called the Flatiron District after its signature building, which has become an icon of New York City.[8] The building was designated a New York City landmark in 1966,[4] was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979,[9] and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1989.[10][11]